Tag Archives: Food Movement

Edible Education 101 – Free classes

FOOD! and FOOD Politics, Processes, Philosophies, it is all here in this series of classes. They are free. You can attend in person or join a streaming conference from your own computer. Sign up!

Public conversations about food have flourished since the 1960s. In the wake of these conversations, it is important to ask, is the “food movement” a social movement? This class will explore what details a social movement and what it will take to shift the power balance.

Building on her vast experience as co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, Saru Jayaraman will discuss ways to take fights for bold social change goals and transform them into sustained action.

Edible Education 101 meets at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business in the Anderson Auditorium on Wednesday, January 31 from 6:15-8PM Pacific Time. You can watch the conversation live online or join us in class on campus. Participation to the community is free of charge. WATCH ONLINE or ATTEND IN PERSON


NEXT UP! Yes there are more classes available –

Week 4 | Wednesday, February 7: Regenerative Cooking: Food, Soil, and Seeds Presented by Chef Dan Barber

Chef Dan Barber will discuss the role of chef and seed breeder collaboration in reshaping our food system and share examples of new vegetable varieties inspired by and celebrated in the Blue Hill kitchen. Dan Barber is the chef and co-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and the author of The Third Plate.  His opinions on food and agricultural policy have appeared in the New York Times and many other publications. Appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, Dan continues the work that he began as a member of Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture board of directors, bringing the principles of good farming directly to the table. Barber has received multiple James Beard awards. In 2009 he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world.

Missed Week Two? Check out our livestream recordings! Thanks to special guests Clair Brown, author of Buddhist Economics, and Margiana Peterson-Rockney for a lively discussion. Watch now >

 

Extending the Growing Season with LEDs

There are so many way to save energy, BEING SMARTER, is my favorite!  -Editor

“There is a lot of potential good to be gotten out of growing produce locally, including food quality, environmental and lower carbon footprint issues,” Mitchell says. “People realize this and the movement to buy local grown produce has grown. The problem has been lighting costs and heating over the seasons when produce can’t be grown outside.”

Highlights of note:

  • Fans of the local food movement who despair through the winter months at high-priced greenhouse-grown or unripe produce transported over thousands of miles might soon find some relief.
  • A study of advanced lighting in greenhouses is successfully using cool and efficient LED systems to grow tomatoes in northern greenhouses through the winter.
  • LED lighting is more energy efficient, and delivers the required amount of light using much less energy.
  • In an experiment, researchers at Mitchell saw no differences in productivity between plants grown under sodium lights and those grown with LEDs.
  • The difference in energy costs was significant, though. Cost for HPS lamps was 403 percent more than that of using vertical LED towers in the study

The harvest season seems to whiz by every year in northern latitudes. Just as the time comes to sink a fork into early spring’s peppery locally grown lettuce and asparagus, the market’s crates are already brimming with winter squash. And the juicy tomatoes that yesterday took a quick ride from a nearby farm start logging thousands of miles from farm to table.

Unfortunately, the only two options for most consumers looking to buy fresh produce during the cold months are either to get them shipped from warmer regions or from greenhouses closer by. Efficiencies in the agricultural and shipping systems being what they are, fruits and vegetables grown in warmer climes—by necessity picked before they ripen to prevent spoilage in transit—cost less than premium-priced food from the greenhouse.

Either way, each of those February cucumbers is the product of a significant energy investment—whether it’s producing the fertilizer, burning fuel in shipping, or lighting and heating commercial greenhouses.

“The average tomato is trucked 1,500 miles from where it’s picked in the winter and it sits on that truck for a week or more,” says Purdue University horticulture professor Cary Mitchell. “By the time it gets to a northern market, it has been in the dark for a while and its quality is degraded. Yet you pay a premium for it—up to four dollars a pound in January.”

Fans of the local food movement who despair through the winter months at high-priced greenhouse-grown or unripe produce transported over thousands of miles might soon find some relief.

Major energy savings

Mitchell is leading a study of advanced lighting in greenhouses that is successfully using cool and efficient LED systems to grow tomatoes in northern greenhouses through the winter. Adopting this new equipment and better growing protocols, commercial growers could cut costs enough to provide produce locally when it’s cold outside.

For the FULL Article, go to The Txchnologist has the news here: LEDs May Be Local Food Movement’s Best Friend in Winter.