Category Archives: Food

Year of the Pig at Oakland Museum and in SF!

Lunar New Year Sunday, February 10, 12–4 pm

OMCA will ring in the Year of the Pig with our 18th Annual Lunar New Year Celebration. Join us for a daylong festival celebrating the diverse Asian cultures represented in California with live music and dance performances, hands-on activities, and much more.

Easy to get to on BART, only one block away from 10th Street–Lake Merritt BART.

Lunar New Year – February 5 – marks the beginning of a new year on the traditional Chinese calendar and is the biggest annual event celebrated by many Asian cultures including Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Korean. 

Most of the top traditions of Chinese New Year observed during the 15-day holiday serve one purpose: to usher in a year of good fortune and prosperity.

The ancient Chinese lunar calendar, on which Chinese New Year is based, functioned as a religious, dynastic and social guide. Oracle bones inscribed with astronomical records indicate that the calendar existed as early as 14th century B.C., when the Shang Dynasty was ruling.

IN SAN FRANCISCO:  The 2019 Chinese New Year Parade is on Saturday, February 23. It starts at 5:15 pm at the corner of 2nd and Market Streets in San Francisco, and is one of the largest in the world. There will be lots of fun events for the lunar new year in both February and March. There are hundreds of lively parade entries! The parade includes several floats, the largest and most popular of which is the 28-foot-long Golden Dragon. It takes a team of more than 100 people to operate and move it through the streets of San Francisco. It then weaves its way through Chinatown and ends at Jackson and Kearny Streets. The parade usually ends around 8pm.

Get there early, take BART to the Montgomery station.

Oakland Museum of California.1000 Oak Street @ 10th Street–Lake Merritt BART

Food Allergies affect so many Infants and Kids

Researchers at Stanford are doing loads of research on desensitizing children to common allergens…. milk, peanuts, eggs to name a few. Allergies are complicated, and difficult to pinpoint. Needless to say, and if you have a infant or child with allergies, you know this to be TRUE.

First, your baby doesn’t want to eat at all… or later may not like certain foods, gagging or breaking out in rashes. It can been much worse. Doctors are now prescribing a record number of epi-pins in the USA. Ask any elementary school teacher — they can have several kids with severe allergies & epi-pins in one class.

We could have a discussion on food safety, GMOs, pesticides, natural v organic… but if your child has a life-threatening allergy, there is no other discussion but how can we keep our baby healthy and safe?

Articles from Stanford:

SF Ferry Building – Pop-up Oktoberfest

Fort Point Hosts Pop-up Oktoberfest Beer Garden

The Food Party: Farm to your table

CUESA’s Sunday Supper: A Farm to City Feast

Healthy Food- how to find It!

Pinto! A new free food app. Ever wonder WHAT is healthy? Reading labels in tiny print doesn’t help much. It is hard to track what ingredients are in which categories like sugar, starch, vitamin.

 

Read on about Pinto:

WHY PINTO? The concept aims to deal a blow to food companies’ sleight of hand, which has to date brought Cheerios cereal dangerously close to being regulated as a cholesterol drug, led Vitaminwater’s lawyers to argue that “no consumer could reasonably be misled into thinking Vitaminwater was a healthy beverage,” and seen Kind Bars scolded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for calling themselves “healthy” (the company argued it was its corporate philosophy that was healthy, ( WHAT? Read that twice!)not the product).

Pinto means to offer a rare brutal honesty in nutrition that favors the honesty over the brutality—not a Yelp for food, but rather a Snopes, backed by roughly 120 dietitians and nutritionists who have been consulting and field-testing for Pinto.

It’s easy to set up your profile & goals. Pick the items you eat- to learn more and you can also get the results for the content/vitamins/ingredients you are tracking.

While the app is free to consumers, Pinto makes money, strangely enough, by telling food retailers exactly what they’re selling. “Obviously they know what they’re selling in terms of ingredients,” says Slover. “But they don’t know how customers are seeing that inventory. A restaurant can learn how much of its menu is Whole30-compliant and shift marketing around that. We offer that data automatically, programmatically, across the board. The share of Americans with specific dietary needs and wants isn’t going anywhere. It’s only going to grow. What we sell is a way to lock in a relationship with them.”

Bees are your Buddies

Do you like to eat fruit? Bees are YOUR best friends. Parents – please teach your kids to respect Bees! Each year I read to Kindergartners – and each time I read books about BEES the kids say ” I hate Bees”. It stuns me and it starts at home. Teach your kids that insects, bees, butterflies provide honey, pollination and ultimately food for us. We LOVE BEES!!!

Bees and other pollinators play a vital role in our food production system by enabling the production of many of the nuts, fruits and vegetables in our diets. In total, pollinators make possible an astounding 35% of global food production and contribute more than $24 billion annually to the U.S. economy.But the number of managed honeybee colonies in the United States has declined from 6 million in the 1940s to just 2.5 million today – jeopardizing our food supply and domestic agriculture industry.3

FLASHBACK from 2014 – That’s why President Obama tasked the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency with co-chairing the Pollinator Health Task Force and leading the federal response to the devastating decline in populations of bees and other vital pollinators.

So far, both the USDA and EPA have displayed a disturbing lack of urgency when it comes to saving bees from deadly pesticides. In fact, the EPA’s current plan is to continue studying neonicotinoid pesticides until 2018 before it takes action to save our pollinators.

It’s 2018 and the story continues.Each person can CHOOSE to not use pesticides, like Round-up, and make their garden inviting to bees. We can make the difference. Round-up is still sold at COSTCO in gigantic containers… right next to the NATIVE BEE HOMES….. Let’s get smart. Don’t buy that toxic junk.  Besides- dandelions are great food for bees, their flowers bloom early and give the bees food when it is winter.   –The editor

 

Ice Cream & Ices – Learning More

Thanks SPARKPEOPLE – I needed to know this!

An Ice Cream Primer
Before we figure out which brands are best, let’s get the scoop on ice cream, fro-yo and all those other icy treats you know and love.

  • Frozen yogurt is yogurt that is frozen using a technique similar to soft serve. While lower in calories and fat than ice cream, not all frozen yogurt is made with live and active cultures the way that standard yogurt is. To make sure that a frozen yogurt contains “yogurt” and a significant amount of live and active cultures, look for the National Yogurt Association (NYA) Live & Active Cultures seal. Without that seal, frozen yogurt does not contain any probiotics.
  • Gelato. This Italian ice cream doesn’t have as much air as traditional ice cream, so it has a much denser texture.
  • Ice cream. As if you needed an explanation, this frozen treat is made from milk or cream, sugar and flavorings. The FDA requires that ice creams with solid additions (nuts, chocolate, fruit, etc.) contain at least 8 percent milk fat, while plain ice creams are required to have at least 10 percent milk fat. “French” ice cream is usually made with a cooked egg custard base.
  • Ice milk is made with lower-fat milk than ice cream, making it less creamy. However, it does contain fewer calories than ice cream.  Try Skinny Cow Ice cream sandwiches…so good!
  • Italian ice (also called Granita) is a mix of juice (or other liquid like coffee), water and sugar, usually in a 4:1 ratio of liquid to sugar. The ices are stirred frequently during freezing to give it a flaky texture. These are almost always fat-free, contain minimal additives and are the lowest in calories of all frozen desserts. You can also make this with WINE – SANGRIA in a bowl anyone?
  • Sherbet has a fruit juice base but often contains some milk, egg whites or gelatin to thicken and richen it. It’s a creamy version of sorbet (see below).
  • Slow-churned (double churned) ice cream is made through low-temperature extrusion, to make light ice cream taste richer, creamier, and more like the full-fat variety. Look for the terms “cold churned,” “slow churned” or “double churned” on the label, which refers to the extrusion’s churning process. Extrusion distributes the milk fat evenly throughout the product for added richness and texture without adding extra calories. By law, “light” ice cream must contain at least 50% less fat or 33% fewer calories than regular full-fat varieties.
  • Soft-serve is a soft “ice cream” that contains double the amount of air as standard ice cream, which stretches the ingredients and creates a lighter texture. It’s lower in fat and calories, but it often contains fillers and additives.
  • Sorbet, softer in consistency than a sherbet, is usually fruit and sugar that has been frozen. Its texture more “solid” and less flaky than Italian ice.

GREAT Free Food Series

Week 7 | Wednesday, February 28: Food and Farmers With Guest Speakers Judith Redmond and Craig McNamara

One of the most opaque relationships in the food system lies behind the relationship between eaters and the farmers who make it possible for us to eat. This class aims to bridge the connection by exploring life as a farmer.

Judith Redmond is a native Californian who has been farming in Northern California since 1989.  She is one of four owners of Full Belly Farm where a diverse assortment of fruits, nuts, and vegetables are grown, sheep and chickens are pastured, and training for interns and children’s educational programming is offered.

Craig McNamara is the president and owner of Sierra Orchards, a diversified farming operation producing primarily organic walnuts. Craig serves as the founder Center for Land-Based Learning, the President of the California State Board of Food and Agriculture, on the UC President’s Advisory Commission and the UC Davis Dean’s Advisory Council. He is an advisory board member of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute, and active in the American Farmland Trust, Roots of Change, and the Public Policy Institute of California.

Edible Education 101 meets at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business in the Anderson Auditorium on Wednesday evenings from 6:15-8PM Pacific Time. You can watch the conversation live online or join us in class on campus. Participation to the community is free of charge.

WATCH ONLINE or ATTEND IN PERSON

Edible Education 101 – Free classes

FOOD! and FOOD Politics, Processes, Philosophies, it is all here in this series of classes. They are free. You can attend in person or join a streaming conference from your own computer. Sign up!

Public conversations about food have flourished since the 1960s. In the wake of these conversations, it is important to ask, is the “food movement” a social movement? This class will explore what details a social movement and what it will take to shift the power balance.

Building on her vast experience as co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, Saru Jayaraman will discuss ways to take fights for bold social change goals and transform them into sustained action.

Edible Education 101 meets at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business in the Anderson Auditorium on Wednesday, January 31 from 6:15-8PM Pacific Time. You can watch the conversation live online or join us in class on campus. Participation to the community is free of charge. WATCH ONLINE or ATTEND IN PERSON


NEXT UP! Yes there are more classes available –

Week 4 | Wednesday, February 7: Regenerative Cooking: Food, Soil, and Seeds Presented by Chef Dan Barber

Chef Dan Barber will discuss the role of chef and seed breeder collaboration in reshaping our food system and share examples of new vegetable varieties inspired by and celebrated in the Blue Hill kitchen. Dan Barber is the chef and co-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and the author of The Third Plate.  His opinions on food and agricultural policy have appeared in the New York Times and many other publications. Appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, Dan continues the work that he began as a member of Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture board of directors, bringing the principles of good farming directly to the table. Barber has received multiple James Beard awards. In 2009 he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world.

Missed Week Two? Check out our livestream recordings! Thanks to special guests Clair Brown, author of Buddhist Economics, and Margiana Peterson-Rockney for a lively discussion. Watch now >

 

Amazon Go Grocery Store opens in Seattle

The new AMAZON GO market,,,,,

This sounds like a 7-11 convenience market, but with more efficiency and stocking the food you promised yourself you’d eat more of this year…. using AI and many technologies to make the experience fast, efficient, with fresh, affordable, quality food.

  1. Walk in the store,
  2. You’ll log on to your Amazon account (download the free app)
  3. Shop for items – fresh food, prepared healthy meals (similar to the meal plan delivery sign-ups)
  4. This AI driven store will track your selections (using QR codes of items you pick up)
  5. Walk out with your items, items will be tallied and you’ll purchase them through the app.

You won’t see aisles of chips, baked goods and frozen food OR checkout lines.

More consumer testing is going on now…. but I hope we get to try it soon.

VentureBeat article