Category Archives: Food

Bees are your Buddies

Do you like to eat fruit? Bees are YOUR best friends. Parents – please teach your kids to respect Bees! Each year I read to Kindergartners – and each time I read books about BEES the kids say ” I hate Bees”. It stuns me and it starts at home. Teach your kids that insects, bees, butterflies provide honey, pollination and ultimately food for us. We LOVE BEES!!!

Bees and other pollinators play a vital role in our food production system by enabling the production of many of the nuts, fruits and vegetables in our diets. In total, pollinators make possible an astounding 35% of global food production and contribute more than $24 billion annually to the U.S. economy.But the number of managed honeybee colonies in the United States has declined from 6 million in the 1940s to just 2.5 million today – jeopardizing our food supply and domestic agriculture industry.3

FLASHBACK from 2014 – That’s why President Obama tasked the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency with co-chairing the Pollinator Health Task Force and leading the federal response to the devastating decline in populations of bees and other vital pollinators.

So far, both the USDA and EPA have displayed a disturbing lack of urgency when it comes to saving bees from deadly pesticides. In fact, the EPA’s current plan is to continue studying neonicotinoid pesticides until 2018 before it takes action to save our pollinators.

It’s 2018 and the story continues.Each person can CHOOSE to not use pesticides, like Round-up, and make their garden inviting to bees. We can make the difference. Round-up is still sold at COSTCO in gigantic containers… right next to the NATIVE BEE HOMES….. Let’s get smart. Don’t buy that toxic junk.  Besides- dandelions are great food for bees, their flowers bloom early and give the bees food when it is winter.   –The editor

 

Ice Cream & Ices – Learning More

Thanks SPARKPEOPLE – I needed to know this!

An Ice Cream Primer
Before we figure out which brands are best, let’s get the scoop on ice cream, fro-yo and all those other icy treats you know and love.

  • Frozen yogurt is yogurt that is frozen using a technique similar to soft serve. While lower in calories and fat than ice cream, not all frozen yogurt is made with live and active cultures the way that standard yogurt is. To make sure that a frozen yogurt contains “yogurt” and a significant amount of live and active cultures, look for the National Yogurt Association (NYA) Live & Active Cultures seal. Without that seal, frozen yogurt does not contain any probiotics.
  • Gelato. This Italian ice cream doesn’t have as much air as traditional ice cream, so it has a much denser texture.
  • Ice cream. As if you needed an explanation, this frozen treat is made from milk or cream, sugar and flavorings. The FDA requires that ice creams with solid additions (nuts, chocolate, fruit, etc.) contain at least 8 percent milk fat, while plain ice creams are required to have at least 10 percent milk fat. “French” ice cream is usually made with a cooked egg custard base.
  • Ice milk is made with lower-fat milk than ice cream, making it less creamy. However, it does contain fewer calories than ice cream.  Try Skinny Cow Ice cream sandwiches…so good!
  • Italian ice (also called Granita) is a mix of juice (or other liquid like coffee), water and sugar, usually in a 4:1 ratio of liquid to sugar. The ices are stirred frequently during freezing to give it a flaky texture. These are almost always fat-free, contain minimal additives and are the lowest in calories of all frozen desserts. You can also make this with WINE – SANGRIA in a bowl anyone?
  • Sherbet has a fruit juice base but often contains some milk, egg whites or gelatin to thicken and richen it. It’s a creamy version of sorbet (see below).
  • Slow-churned (double churned) ice cream is made through low-temperature extrusion, to make light ice cream taste richer, creamier, and more like the full-fat variety. Look for the terms “cold churned,” “slow churned” or “double churned” on the label, which refers to the extrusion’s churning process. Extrusion distributes the milk fat evenly throughout the product for added richness and texture without adding extra calories. By law, “light” ice cream must contain at least 50% less fat or 33% fewer calories than regular full-fat varieties.
  • Soft-serve is a soft “ice cream” that contains double the amount of air as standard ice cream, which stretches the ingredients and creates a lighter texture. It’s lower in fat and calories, but it often contains fillers and additives.
  • Sorbet, softer in consistency than a sherbet, is usually fruit and sugar that has been frozen. Its texture more “solid” and less flaky than Italian ice.

GREAT Free Food Series

Week 7 | Wednesday, February 28: Food and Farmers With Guest Speakers Judith Redmond and Craig McNamara

One of the most opaque relationships in the food system lies behind the relationship between eaters and the farmers who make it possible for us to eat. This class aims to bridge the connection by exploring life as a farmer.

Judith Redmond is a native Californian who has been farming in Northern California since 1989.  She is one of four owners of Full Belly Farm where a diverse assortment of fruits, nuts, and vegetables are grown, sheep and chickens are pastured, and training for interns and children’s educational programming is offered.

Craig McNamara is the president and owner of Sierra Orchards, a diversified farming operation producing primarily organic walnuts. Craig serves as the founder Center for Land-Based Learning, the President of the California State Board of Food and Agriculture, on the UC President’s Advisory Commission and the UC Davis Dean’s Advisory Council. He is an advisory board member of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute, and active in the American Farmland Trust, Roots of Change, and the Public Policy Institute of California.

Edible Education 101 meets at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business in the Anderson Auditorium on Wednesday evenings from 6:15-8PM Pacific Time. You can watch the conversation live online or join us in class on campus. Participation to the community is free of charge.

WATCH ONLINE or ATTEND IN PERSON

Edible Education 101 – Free classes

FOOD! and FOOD Politics, Processes, Philosophies, it is all here in this series of classes. They are free. You can attend in person or join a streaming conference from your own computer. Sign up!

Public conversations about food have flourished since the 1960s. In the wake of these conversations, it is important to ask, is the “food movement” a social movement? This class will explore what details a social movement and what it will take to shift the power balance.

Building on her vast experience as co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, Saru Jayaraman will discuss ways to take fights for bold social change goals and transform them into sustained action.

Edible Education 101 meets at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business in the Anderson Auditorium on Wednesday, January 31 from 6:15-8PM Pacific Time. You can watch the conversation live online or join us in class on campus. Participation to the community is free of charge. WATCH ONLINE or ATTEND IN PERSON


NEXT UP! Yes there are more classes available –

Week 4 | Wednesday, February 7: Regenerative Cooking: Food, Soil, and Seeds Presented by Chef Dan Barber

Chef Dan Barber will discuss the role of chef and seed breeder collaboration in reshaping our food system and share examples of new vegetable varieties inspired by and celebrated in the Blue Hill kitchen. Dan Barber is the chef and co-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and the author of The Third Plate.  His opinions on food and agricultural policy have appeared in the New York Times and many other publications. Appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, Dan continues the work that he began as a member of Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture board of directors, bringing the principles of good farming directly to the table. Barber has received multiple James Beard awards. In 2009 he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world.

Missed Week Two? Check out our livestream recordings! Thanks to special guests Clair Brown, author of Buddhist Economics, and Margiana Peterson-Rockney for a lively discussion. Watch now >

 

Amazon Go Grocery Store opens in Seattle

The new AMAZON GO market,,,,,

This sounds like a 7-11 convenience market, but with more efficiency and stocking the food you promised yourself you’d eat more of this year…. using AI and many technologies to make the experience fast, efficient, with fresh, affordable, quality food.

  1. Walk in the store,
  2. You’ll log on to your Amazon account (download the free app)
  3. Shop for items – fresh food, prepared healthy meals (similar to the meal plan delivery sign-ups)
  4. This AI driven store will track your selections (using QR codes of items you pick up)
  5. Walk out with your items, items will be tallied and you’ll purchase them through the app.

You won’t see aisles of chips, baked goods and frozen food OR checkout lines.

More consumer testing is going on now…. but I hope we get to try it soon.

VentureBeat article

We live in the SF Bay Area, a  NIRVANA for food-lovers! There are classes, professional leadership seminars, food hackathons, tours, gourmet field to table extravaganzas, and also this wonderful opportunity made available by Alice Waters and Will Rosenzweig, leaders in thoughtful eating, great food, and sustainability.

  • CLASS: Edible Education 101
  • DATE: Begins Wednesday 1/17
  • Details below:

It is my privilege to join Alice Waters to co-host Edible Education 101 again this semester.  This uniquely UC Berkeley course, now in its seventh year, is available to undergraduates, graduate students and the local community and is live-streamed and archived online. EE 101 meets Wednesday evenings (6:15 to 8pm Pacific Time) beginning January 17, 2018. We’d encourage you to share this invitation with friends who are passionate about shaping a healthy and regenerative food system.

Once again we are honored to hear from the thoughtful, informed and provocative voices shaping and leading the food movement. The course explores current food issues against a backdrop of systems thinking, ethical action, creativity and innovation. This semester we will also showcase the work of inspiring, emerging leaders who are making a difference in diverse disciplines. Our intent is to help our community of learners develop “food systems intelligence” — a way of seeing and acting in our local and global food ecologies with clear intent and an understanding of our personal and collective impacts. We also hope to build a bridge for students to envision how they can apply themselves personally and professionally in the world of food. Here is the schedule of guest lecturers and topics (with special surprises in the works). All classes are on Wednesday evenings at 6:15 pm PST.        Our teaching team will be creating a weekly newsletter with a link to the class readings and video archive. Each edition will preview the coming class content and will provide a recap of the prior week’s highlights. We will also post weekly invitations (space permitting) to obtain a ticket to attend the class in person, on campus. If you received this email from a friend or colleague and would like to join the class and get weekly updates, click here. If you do not wish to receive weekly course updates or invites, you can opt-out by clicking on the link at the bottom of this email.  We look forward to seeing you in class! With all good thoughts, Will Rosenzweig Social Impact Fellow Special thanks to Berkeley Haas Center for Responsible Business, The Edible Schoolyard Project, Food Venture Lab, and Steve Silberstein for the generous support and collaboration that makes this course possible and broadly available.

It is my privilege to join Alice Waters to co-host Edible Education 101 again this semester.  This uniquely UC Berkeley course, now in its seventh year, is available to undergraduates, graduate students and the local community and is live-streamed and archived online. EE 101 meets Wednesday evenings (6:15 to 8pm Pacific Time) beginning January 17, 2018. We’d encourage you to share this invitation with friends who are passionate about shaping a healthy and regenerative food system.

Once again we are honored to hear from the thoughtful, informed and provocative voices shaping and leading the food movement. The course explores current food issues against a backdrop of systems thinking, ethical action, creativity and innovation. This semester we will also showcase the work of inspiring, emerging leaders who are making a difference in diverse disciplines. Our intent is to help our community of learners develop “food systems intelligence” — a way of seeing and acting in our local and global food ecologies with clear intent and an understanding of our personal and collective impacts. We also hope to build a bridge for students to envision how they can apply themselves personally and professionally in the world of food. Here is the schedule of guest lecturers and topics (with special surprises in the works). All classes are on Wednesday evenings at 6:15 pm PST.        Our teaching team will be creating a weekly newsletter with a link to the class readings and video archive. Each edition will preview the coming class content and will provide a recap of the prior week’s highlights. We will also post weekly invitations (space permitting) to obtain a ticket to attend the class in person, on campus. If you received this email from a friend or colleague and would like to join the class and get weekly updates, click here. If you do not wish to receive weekly course updates or invites, you can opt-out by clicking on the link at the bottom of this email.  We look forward to seeing you in class! With all good thoughts, Will Rosenzweig Social Impact Fellow Special thanks to Berkeley Haas Center for Responsible Business, The Edible Schoolyard Project, Food Venture Lab, and Steve Silberstein for the generous support and collaboration that makes this course possible and broadly available.

going Meatless…. Doesn’t have to be Hard

There are so many choices! We have eaten Vegan for nearly 3 months. Yes there have been a few slips, but it is easy really.  Why?

  • You’ll try new restaurants
  • Cookbooks will be come a new point of inspiration
  • Don’t you want to KNOW what the IMPOSSIBLE Burger is? Get yours in Palo Alto, CA, yes it is Vegan, you won’t believe it! Picture below!
  • Also Ike’s Sandwiches and Love is incredible fun, they have a huge selection of vegetarian entrees and all of those can be made VEGAN! My husband’s favorite is The Meatless Ike’s Sub. So good!  (The IKE’S are in several locations in the Bay Area – we have tried Daly City Serramonte, Redwood City – El Camino)

Fainting Goats – Curious?

Image result for fainting goatsA friend of mine has a goat that goes catatonic when it hears a loud noise. If she sneezes or the screen door slams. ..Then it tips over. Amazing but not uncommon. I had to learn more!  They are classified as meat goats rather than milk goats…. but they might be better described as “pet goats”. Often selected as pets, due to their smaller stature, they are 17 to 25 inches tall and can weigh 60 lbs…. or more.

This ailment can be found in other animals, humans included.

A myotonic goat, otherwise known as the fainting goat, is a domestic goat that freezes for roughly 3 seconds when it feels panic. Though painless, this generally results in the animal collapsing on its side. The characteristic is caused by a hereditary genetic disorder called myotonia congenita. When startled, younger goats will stiffen and fall over. Older goats learn to spread their legs or lean against something when startled, and often they continue to run about in an awkward, stiff-legged shuffle.  Fainting goats have many other names, including Myotonic Goats, Tennessee (Meat) Goats, Nervous Goats, Stiff-leg Goats, Wooden-leg Goats, and Tennessee Fainting Goats….   – Wikipedia

References:  Fainting Goat Facts

 

 

 

 

 

Vina Enoteca to serve first ‘Impossible burger’ in Silicon Valley

A burger made entirely from plants at a Redwood City startup has been making waves at select restaurants in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York — and now, in Palo Alto.

The Impossible Foods burger sun-dried tomatoes, cavolo nero (or lacinato kale) and a sun-dried tomatoes mayonnaise on a poppy seed bun will make its debut today at Vina Enoteca, the first Silicon Valley restaurant to serve the scientifically engineered veggie burgers.

The goal is to not only make a veggie burger that tastes good, but one that is environmentally sustainable and ultimately will change the way we consume meat.

 

Dandelion Chocolate Oatmeal Cookie RECIPE!!

Dandelion has graciously offered their recipe for their delicious hearty Chocolate Oatmeal Cookie! You can give these to Dad for Father’s Day, to the Grads in your life on their special day, or for yourself any day of the week!

YUM!